Friday, September 15, 2017

"The Shulammite's Truth"

Song of Solomon 7:5, 10 NASU

“And the flowing locks of your head are like purple threads; the king is captivated by your tresses.

“I am my beloved's, and his desire is for me.”

The Song of Solomon describes with vivid sensuality and sexual imagery the love between young king Solomon and his exceedingly beautiful Shulammite bride. This “R” rated tale of romance is found near the middle of the Bible...  Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon. It’s historical poetry depicting two real people unleashed in their passion and love for each other.  

But, as is often true with ancient biblical literature, there is more meaning to be found. Hidden behind each one of its 117 verses is a message for you. You are the bride and Jesus is the groom and you may rest securely in His never-ending, unbounded, and limitless love. As “the king is captivated by the tresses” of his beloved, so Jesus is smitten with you. When He looks at you, His eyes hold the wonder and desire far transcending that of a young man in love. You are the object of Christ’s singular and eternal affection. As far as He’s concerned, there is no other. You’re it and you’re enough.

The miracle is not that you and I are loved to this degree. The miraculous occurs when we accept this fact for ourselves. Heaven rejoices when we become confidently aware of the Shulammite’s truth:

“I am my beloved’s,
and His desire is for me.”

When we believe the love of Christ, something nearly unbelievable happens. We discover that eternal security is not a doctrine for debate. Rather, it is a deep knowing of the soul. Jesus is literally “captivated” by you and, in turn, His love makes you want to sing...

“Jesus loves me this I know,
For the Bible tells me so.”

“Yes, Jesus loves me,
Yes, Jesus loves me,
Yes, Jesus loves me;
The Bible tells me so.”

____________________

The art pictured above comes from a collection of silk-screen prints inspired by the Song of Solomon. The first is entitled “Dove’s Eyes” and the second is called “My Love.” Tamar Messer is a well-known Israeli artist who beautifully portrays stories from the Hebrew scriptures in her colorful work. Find out more about Tamar and her art at http://www.tamarmesser.com.

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